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Terence Connor McCorkell


Position/Title: M.Sc. by thesis
email: tmccorke@uoguelph.ca
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Education: 

Honors, Bachelor of Science in Animal Science

Master of Science in Companion Animal Nutrition Student

 


Biography:

Growing up in small-town rural Canada, my love of animals began early in life while surrounded by a variety of family pets including, dogs, cats, and horses. Like many young animal lovers, I aspired to become a veterinarian one day and used to pretend to heal our family pets when they became "sick". My passion for animal health lead me to the University of Guelph, where I studied Animal Science in my undergraduate degree. During my 3rd and 4th year, I decided to take a few courses in animal nutrition and metabolism, one of which was advanced equine nutrition taught by Dr. Anna Kate Shoveller. It was during this time that I discovered my passion for nutrition and just how important it is for optimal animal health and wellbeing. This course sparked my interest, later leading me to complete an undergraduate research thesis in animal nutrition. I have additionally had the pleasure of working with the Clinical Nutrition Service at the Ontario Veterinary College, under the guidance of Dr. Caitlin Grant, where I assisted with both clinical cases and research projects acting as their Clinical Nutrition Intern, offering myself a wealth of learning opportunities in veterinary nutrition.

Continuing this passion into a Master of Animal Science degree under the guidance of Dr. Anna Kate Shoveller, my research interest is to better understand how dogs and horses adapt to seasonal environmental changes by analyzing their salivary and plasma concentrations of minerals over an extended period of time and comparing this with the environmental temperature and humidity where the animals are housed. While prolonged or highly intense exercise, and extreme climatic conditions primarily affect electrolyte concentrations in these animals, acute changes in temperature outside and within the thermoneutral zone and during season change may also affect electrolyte status. The knowledge gained in this research on mineral utilization and seasonality in both species may help animal owners improve their animals' health, welfare and longevity by accounting for periods when minerals are provided in excess or deficit.

In my free time, I enjoy travelling, photography, hiking with my dog, and spending time with friends and family.